spins

Scientists see spins in a 2D magnet

Scientists see spins in a 2D magnet

The pairing between magnons and excitons will allow researchers to see spin directions, an important consideration for several quantum applications. Credit: Chung-Jui Yu All magnets—from the simple souvenirs hanging on your refrigerator to the disks that give your computer memory to the powerful versions used in research labs—contain spinning quasiparticles called magnons. The direction one …

Scientists see spins in a 2D magnet Read More »

Scientists see spins in a 2D magnet

Scientists see spins in a 2D magnet

The pairing between magnons and excitons will allow researchers to see spin directions, an important consideration for several quantum applications. Credit: Chung-Jui Yu All magnets—from the simple souvenirs hanging on your refrigerator to the disks that give your computer memory to the powerful versions used in research labs—contain spinning quasiparticles called magnons. The direction one …

Scientists see spins in a 2D magnet Read More »

The solar system, not to scale.

The inner solar system spins much more slowly than it should. Now, scientists may know why.

The inner solar system spins much more slowly than the laws of modern physics predict, and a new study may help to explain why.  A thin disk of gas and dust — known as an accretion disk — spirals around young stars. These disks, where planets form, contain leftover star-forming material that is a fraction …

The inner solar system spins much more slowly than it should. Now, scientists may know why. Read More »